characterandwritinghelp
characterandwritinghelp

maxkirin:

Hello, writerly friends~ ♥︎

You asked for a Writing Advice Masterpost, so here it is! Below you will find a collection of the best questions and answers from the last two years. Not only that, but they are also organized so you can find the answers to your questions quickly and get on with writing.

But wait, there is more!

This post is more than just a collection of advice, it’s a nexus for writing advice, resources, and information! That’s right, this post is going to grow over time. I will be updating this masterpost WEEKLY with new answers, writing advice videos, playlists, and more! So, make sure to bookmark this page and follow my blog (maxkirin.tumblr.com) so you don’t miss a thing~ ♥︎

Prompts

Virtual Writing Academy

Motivation & Inspiration

Planning, Outlining, and Getting Started

Dialogue

Editing & Revision

Hot Button Issues

General Advice

Publishing

Writing Music & Playlists

Last Updated: 07-11-14. Click HERE to see the latest update.

thebooker
thebooker:

I started the underrated book project back in February 2013 and I’m amazed at its success. I never expected it would receive such a large following. I just wanted to say thank you if you’ve recommended books, reblogged the posts, read books that are featured in the posts, or simply followed the project from any period between then and now. I couldn’t have done it without you!

What is the Underrated Book Project?
The project is essentially a collection of posts on my blog that aim to promote underrated and under-appreciated books and authors. The goal is to spread the word and provide people with a huge list of recommendations and hopefully inspire them to read such lesser known books. There are over 1000 books featured in the project.
Find out about the project
View all of the posts
View posts by genre
Directory
How can you help?
I accept recommendations for books, series and authors to be included in the project. All you need to do is message me with your suggestion and I shall create a post on it as part of the project. It would also be a huge help if you could reblog the posts and do anything you can think of to spread the word through social media.

thebooker:

I started the underrated book project back in February 2013 and I’m amazed at its success. I never expected it would receive such a large following. I just wanted to say thank you if you’ve recommended books, reblogged the posts, read books that are featured in the posts, or simply followed the project from any period between then and now. I couldn’t have done it without you!

What is the Underrated Book Project?

The project is essentially a collection of posts on my blog that aim to promote underrated and under-appreciated books and authors. The goal is to spread the word and provide people with a huge list of recommendations and hopefully inspire them to read such lesser known books. There are over 1000 books featured in the project.

How can you help?

I accept recommendations for books, series and authors to be included in the project. All you need to do is message me with your suggestion and I shall create a post on it as part of the project. It would also be a huge help if you could reblog the posts and do anything you can think of to spread the word through social media.

clevergirlhelps

Anonymous asked:

I'm writing a book where the main characters best friend dies and I need some help with writing a death scene

elumish answered:

Here are a few things to think about:

Why (in universe) does the character die? Is it an accident? Is it a random stranger who mugs them, hits them by a car, etc.? Is it murder? Is it part of a war? Whether or not the death is intentional in-universe is important when it comes to writing a death scene.

How does the character die? Obviously, some of these questions are answered by answering the previous question, but even within the realm of murder, war, mugging, etc., the how matters. Think about what weapons the character will have. Think about what weapons whoever kills them (if someone kills them) has. If they’re poisoned, figure out how they ingest the poison. Figure out all of the little details, especially if you show the death scene in the story (as opposed to just talking about it).

How long does it take them to die? If the main character (or anyone else) is there, it matters a lot how long it takes for the best friend to die. If they die instantly (and without warning), nobody has a chance to say goodbye. If they take a long time to die, the main character (or anyone else) would be able to talk to them.

Why (in meta) does the character die? Essentially, why do you want to kill them? Is it an important plot point, or are you just sick of writing them. If the only reason that you’re killing them is because you’re sick of writing them, you should seriously reconsider having them as a character at all. Similarly, if their only reason for dying is because you need some reason to have the main character’s personality change, make sure that this isn’t just because you got sick of having the main character act the way that they do. Make the death important, because otherwise people will think it’s stupid.

What was your character’s feelings towards them right before the death? I know that you said that the character is the best friend, but people aren’t 100% totally blissfully happy with their best friend 24/7. Did they have a fight? Was there something left unsaid? Were they blissfully happy as best friends?

Who else is the character leaving behind? Just because they are the main character’s best friend, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have other people in their life. They probably have other friends, family members, possibly lovers/significant others. Their death should affect people other than just the main character.

Make the character a real character before you kill them. Especially when you want the death to be a sympathetic one (which I assume you do), you need to make sure that the readers care about them before they day. Don’t just make them important in the context of the main character. Make them important in their own right. Then their death matters.

Kill them at the right time. Or, rather, kill them at the wrong time. Kill them when it hurts the most for them to die. Kill them just when the main character needs them most, just when they’re about to do something important, just when they’re about to change their life. Doing it when people have the most to lose. That’s when it matters the most. Obviously, this isn’t the only choice, but this will have some of the greatest emotional impact.

If you have a question with more specifics, I can give you an answer with more specifics. Otherwise, I hope this helps.

characterandwritinghelp

thecharactercomma:

Trilogies seem to be a trend of the fantasy world, and as a result, some of us assume trilogies are the way to go. You get your characters, your plot, your opening scene, and you say, “this will be a trilogy!” Because, well, all the greats come in threes. Hunger Games,…

characterandwritinghelp

writtenbymadeline:

A tool to use for find Synonyms: Synonym Finder.

This is a great, unique little tool I found by browsing for writing resources. It’s name speaks for itself: it’s a synonym finder.

The site is clean cut, has soothing colors, and to-the point results for any word you look up.

For example, when I look up the word “romance,” I get this:

Synonyms: romance, romanticism
Definition: an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)

Hypernyms: quality
Definition: an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone
Usage: the quality of mercy is not strained—Shakespeare”

I had no idea what a “hypernym” is. Apparently it’s a word with a more general meaning that a more specific word fall under. Like, color is a hypernym for green.

On the right corner there’s a button to make graphs! So you can trace each synonym from it’s root word, and see how far the other synonyms connect in comparison to others.

I really like it, so I’m going to definitely bookmark it on my writing tools list.

characterandwritinghelp

mad-hunter2185 asked:

Many people think books written by teens tend to be weak structured and lack certain elements. Why is that and how do I avoid this?

fixyourwritinghabits answered:

This is not a problem with young writers; it’s a problem with inexperienced writers, who are also often young. It gets attached to teen writers especially, whether or not that’s fair.

Here are some links that can help you with structure:

I recommend checking out books in your genre of choice (and other genres as well) and take notes as you read. Look for:

One big thing that all novels hinge on our strong characters. Here are some links that can help you with that.